The Pentagon Was Shocked At What President Trump Told President Duterte

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U.S. President Donald Trump called Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte on April 29, 2017 and their conversation revolved around the problem with North Korea and with Kim Jong Un's nuclear ambition.

Pentagon officials however are in shock after a transcript of their conversation was released on May 23, 2017. Pentagon officials are very careful about discussing the movement of their submarines as is it their military's belief that their stealth is the key to their mission.

In their conversation, President Trump told President Duterte that the U.S. has two nuclear submarines in the area. Trump said: "We have two submarines -- the best in the world -- we have two nuclear submarines -- no that we want to use them at all."


They also talked about China and how China is the key to keeping North Korea in check. Duterte said he will call China's President Xi Jinping. Duterte told Trump: "I will try to make a call to President Xi Jinping and I will try to tell him if …

Computer History Museum Makes Historic MS-DOS and Word for Windows Source Code Available to the Public

Mountain View, Ca—March 25, 2014— The Computer History Museum (CHM) announced today that it has, with permission from Microsoft Corporation, made available original source code for two historic programs: MS-DOS, the 1982 "Disk Operating System" for IBM-compatible personal computers, and Word for Windows, the 1990 Windows-based version of their word processor.

IBM went outside the company for many hardware and software components of their 1981 personal computer. Though most vendors were kept in the dark about the project, code-named “Chess,” IBM developed a unique relationship between their Boca Raton-based team and Microsoft, then a small company based in Seattle.

Microsoft, which was providing the BASIC language interpreter, agreed to also supply an operating system. Without their own operating system already in place, they licensed a product from nearby Seattle Computer Products and worked closely with IBM to make the changes they wanted. It shipped as "PC-DOS" for IBM and "MS-DOS" for other PC manufacturers. We are today releasing the source code of MS-DOS version 1.1 from 1982, and of version 2.0 from 1983.

"Version 1.1 fits an entire operating system – limited as it was – into only 12K bytes of memory, which is tiny compared to today's software," said Len Shustek, CHM Chairman.

Microsoft's DOS-based version of Word, first released in 1983, was not a success against the dominant word processor of that era, WordPerfect. The 1989 release of Word for Windows changed all that: within four years it was generating over half the worldwide word processing market revenue. It was a remarkable marketing and engineering achievement. We are today revealing the technical magic by releasing the source code to version 1.1a of Word for Windows.

“MS-DOS and Word for Windows built the foundation for Microsoft’s success in the technology industry,” said Roy Levin, distinguished engineer and managing director, Microsoft Research. “By contributing these source codes to the Computer History Museum archives, Microsoft is making these historic systems from the early era of personal computing available to the community for historical and technical scholarship.”

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